Monday, January 25, 2016

What I Learned From Time Tracking (part 1)

time tracking data

Soooo.  I'm not going to bore everyone with a race report, because I'm already bored trying to write it.  I will just summarize:

1) It was COLD
2) I ran pretty steady splits!  Yay.
3) I did probably lose a minute in the photo op w/ A&C
4) That was totally worth it
5) I met my (not too ambitious) goal and post-kid PR'ed!

And I'm going to take this entire week off from working out.  Maybe I will do some barre3 and a short easy run this weekend, but Monday-Friday are going to be rest days.  I am super sore and very slow today, so I think I need it.  And I think it's natural/healthy to take a purposeful break every now and then. 

In other news, I finished time tracking for a week!  I vaguely remember doing this once before, and coming to the same conclusions:

(yeah, another list - sorry!)

1) I do not have time/energy to do everything I would like to do in an idealized life (nor does anyone else, I am sure!)
2) I hate that I waste time that I do have on the internet.

Ana wrote an intriguing post last week entitled Three Thing I Wish I Didn't Enjoy.  I thought long and hard, but I could only come up with one.  And it's THE INTERNET.  As in: BLOGS.  FACEBOOK.  SOCIAL MEDIA.  THE VOYEURISTIC EXPERIENCE OF READING ABOUT SOMEONE ELSE'S THOUGHTS, LIFE, EXPERIENCES.

I have for the longest time been drawn to this.  I have no idea why.  And today's apps/social media avenues are just evil (in my opinion) in that their singular goal is to keep my eyes on them for as long as humanly possible.  To make me click to check out "likes" instead of reading, singing, walking, listening, living.  I hate that I enjoy this, and that I do it.  It's sort of a flow state, in that an hour can pass in what seems like five minutes, but then the hour is just . . . gone.  And I learned nothing, gained nothing.

I suppose the time log was useful in that it (once again) illustrated how precious each moment really is (because on paper, that week looks quite short!), and provided some hard data on what I need to work on if I truly want to get the most out of life.